The market for used Legos is growing 11% annually — faster than stocks and bonds, a study shows

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According to a study, Lego can be a better investment than gold, art and stocks.

It found that the secondary market for old Lego sets is growing 11 percent annually, faster than gold bullion, stocks, bonds, stamps and wine.

The study even claimed that the value of old devices increased during the 2008 financial crash.

The research means Britons could have a gold mine of old toys gathering dust in their attics and cupboards.

According to a study, Lego can be a better investment than gold, art and stocks. Pictured: Millennium Falcon set from Star Wars

It found that the secondary market for old Lego sets is growing 11 percent annually, faster than gold bullion, stocks, bonds, stamps and wine

It found that the secondary market for old Lego sets is growing 11 percent annually, faster than gold bullion, stocks, bonds, stamps and wine

The study even claimed that the value of old devices increased during the 2008 financial crash

The study even claimed that the value of old devices increased during the 2008 financial crash

Researchers suggest several reasons for the increase in the value of retired Lego, including limited supply, a scarcity of sets that will be resold in retirement and even fewer that will be flogged in good condition, and Lego’s decades-long popularity.

For the study, experts looked at the prices of 2,322 Lego sets from 1987 to 2015.

The most expensive include Star Wars Millennium Falcon, Death Star II and Imperial Star Destroyer, as well as models of the Cafe on the Corner and Taj Mahal buildings.

The research also revealed that Barbie dolls, superhero minifigures, or model cars and trains are coveted collectibles.

The research means Britons could have a gold mine of old toys gathering dust in their attics and cupboards

The research means Britons could have a gold mine of old toys gathering dust in their attics and cupboards

Russia’s Higher School of Economics University (HSE) conducted the study, which suggests that Lego collectors are among the smartest investors as they can resell for huge returns.

HSE University’s Victoria Dobrynskaya said: “Investors in Lego make high returns by reselling unpackaged sets, especially rarer ones that were limited edition or made long ago.

“Sets that were produced 20 to 30 years ago make Lego fans nostalgic and the prices for them go through the roof.

“But despite the high profitability of Lego sets in the secondary market in general, not all sets are equally successful and it takes a true Lego fan to see the nuances of the market and the investment potential in a given set.”

For the study, experts looked at the prices of 2,322 Lego sets from 1987 to 2015

For the study, experts looked at the prices of 2,322 Lego sets from 1987 to 2015

The data included information on primary sales and online auction transactions of new unopened sets.

Aftermarket prices typically start to rise two or three years after a device is retired.

But there is a significant variability in returns, ranging from minus 50 percent to more than 600 percent annually.

Small and very large kit prices are increasing faster than medium-sized kit prices.

This is most likely because small sets often feature unique parts or figures, while large ones are made in small batches and are more appealing to adults.

The most expensive include Millennium Falcon, Death Star II and Imperial Star Destroyer from Star Wars, as well as models of the Cafe on the Corner and Taj Mahal buildings

The most expensive include Millennium Falcon, Death Star II and Imperial Star Destroyer from Star Wars, as well as models of the Cafe on the Corner and Taj Mahal buildings

The prices of thematic sets dedicated to famous buildings, popular films or seasonal holidays tend to experience the highest growth in the secondary market.

Another attractive category are sets that are limited edition or given away at promotional events, as rarity increases their value from a collector’s perspective.

It comes after Lego vowed to remove gender stereotypes from its toys after a survey showed boys fear they will be “mocked” for playing with toys marketed for girls.

The famous Danish company, the world’s largest toy manufacturer, says their products are mainly used by little boys.

But it says it will now work to remove gender bias from its toys and push for products for both sexes.

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